Book 1 Full Literal Translation



1 - 519


1           I sing of arms and a man, who first from the boundaries of Troy, exiled by fate, came to Italy and the Lavinian shores – he was tossed much both on land and on sea, by the power of the gods, on account of the mindful anger of savage Juno, he having suffered many (things) and also from war, until he could found a city, and was bringing in the gods to Latium, from whence [came] the race of Latins, and Alban fathers, and of the high city walls of Rome.

8            Muse, recall the causes to me, by what damaged nod, or grieving what, the queen of the gods compelled  a man marked by piety to undergo so many misfortunes, to come to so many labors. Can there be such great anger in the minds of the gods?

12            There was an ancient city, ((which) Tyrian colonists held) Carthage, long opposite Italy and the mouths of the Tiber, rich in resources and most fierce in the pursuits of war; Juno is said to have cherished this one city more than all lands with Samus having been esteemed less; here were her arms, here was her chariot; if in any way the fates would allow it, the goddess both hoped and cherished this (city) to be a seat of power for the nations. But indeed she had heard that the offspring derived from Trojan blood, which, one day, would overturn the Tyrian castles. From whence was going to come a nation, ruling far and wide and proud in war for the destruction of Libya: Thus the Fates unfolded. Saturn’s daughter, fearing this and remembering the Old War, which she foremost had waged for her dear Greeks (nor yet even then had the causes of anger and cruel pain perished from her mind; Judgment of Paris remains repositive in her deep mind and the injury to her rejected beauty, and the hated race, and the honors of the seduced Ganymede – Further inflamed by these (things), she was keeping a long way from Latium the Trojans having been thrown on the whole ocean, the leavings of the Greeks and of fierce Achilles, and they were wandering through [or for] many years, having been driven by the Fates around all the oceans. So great was the burden to found the Roman nation.
34            Scarcely out of sight of the Sicilian land, they happy gave the sails into the deep and rushed the froth of salt with bronze, when Juno keeping the eternal wound under her chest [said] these things with herself:

37   must I cease from having begun, defeated, and not be able to turn the king of the Teucrians from Italy. Indeed I am forbidden by the Fates. Surely Pallas (Athena) was able to burn the Argive fleet and submerge themselves in the sea on account of the crime one and the madness of Oileian Ajax?

42.  [She] herself having thrown the swift fire of Jove from the clouds both scattered the ships and overturned the sea with winds, with wind she snatched him with his pierced chest breathing out fire and impaled him on a sharp rock.

46.  But I, who walk [in the company] of the gods as queen, both sister and wife of Jove, wage wars with one nation for so many years. And who(ever) adores the power of Juno hereafter, or what(ever) suppliant places honors on [her] altars?

50.    With her heart inflamed the goddess pondering such things with herself she went into Aeolia, the country of the clouds, places pregnant with the raging south winds. Here King Aeolus in a vast cave with his power controls struggling winds and roaring tempests and restrains them both with chains and in prison.

55.     They indignant roar with a great rumble around the restraints of the mountain. Aeolus sits in a towering palace holding a scepter and softens the spirits and calms the angers.

57.    If he would not (do it), indeed they would rapid[ly] carry (off) the seas and the lands and the vast heaven with them, and they would sweep through the skies.

60.  But fearing this, the omnipotent father hid [them] away in black caves, and he placed a structure and high mountains above [them], and gave a king who by contract knew both  [when] to press down and having been ordered [when] to give loose reins. Toward whom then Juno as suppliant used these words:

65.    Aeolus, to you the father of the gods and the king of men gave [power] both to calm the waves and to raise up with wind; a nation hateful to me sails the Tyrrhenian sea carrying Illium and the conquered Penates (gods) into Italy. Strike force with winds and crush the submerged sterns (ships) or drive the scattered [Trojans] scatter their bodies in the ocean.

71.    There are for me (I have) twice seven (fourteen) nymphs surpassing in body, which of whom the most beautiful in form, Deiopea, I will join in lasting wedlock and I will proclaim [her] your own, so that for such services she may pass with you all the years and she may make you a parent with beautiful offspring.

76.    Aeolus in reply [said] these things: It is your work O queen to explore what you wish [for]; it is right for me to perform commands.

78.   You [make, give] to me whatever of a kingdom this is, you win over the scepter(s) and Jove, you allow [me] to recline at the feasts of the gods, and you make [me] powerful of clouds and storms.

81   When these things were said, he struck the hollow mountain in the side with a turned spear: and the winds, as with a battle line having been formed where a door was given, they rush and the blow over the land with a storm.

84.   They lay upon the seas and they rushed the whole [sea] from the deepest places together the East wind (Eurus) and the South wind (Notus) and the Southwest wind (Africus) crowded with gusts and they roll vast waves to the shores.

87.  Both the clamor of men and the creaking of ropes follow.  Suddenly clouds snatch away the heavens and the day from the eyes of the Trojans; black night lays upon the sea.  

90.  The skies thundered and the upper air flashed with frequent lightening and all things threaten (aim) [to] the men with instant death.

92.  At once the limbs of Aeneas are relaxed (go limp) with cold [fear]; he groans and stretching both palms to the stars he says (it is reported) such things with voice:

94.  Thee times and four times blessed [is] who[ever] it befell to encounter (death) before the faces of fathers beneath the high walls of Troy.

96.  O Diomedes, bravest of the race of Danaeans, Could I not have been able to fall on the Trojan plains and to pour out this spirit by your right hand, where savage Hector lay by the weapon of Achilles, , where huge Sarpedon [lies], where so many shields and helmets snatched up under waves by the Samois, and (so many) brave bodies roll.

102.   While throwing out these things, a roaring blast from the north strikes the sail head on, and lifts waves to the stars.  The oars are shattered, then the prow gives its side to the waves, a towering mountain of water follows in a pile.

106.   They hang on the top of a wave; a splitting wave discloses to them land among the waves, a tide rages with the sands.

108.   The south wind twists three ships onto lurking rocks (The Italians call the rocks which are in the middle of the waves, ‘The Altars,’ a tremendous spine at the surface of the sea), Eurus (East wind) drove three ships from the deep into the shallow and onto a reef, miserable to see, and dashed [them] into the shoals and surrounded them in a mound of sand.

113.    One [ship] which was carrying Lycians and trusted Orontes, a huge sea struck into the stern from high above before his (himself’s) very eyes;

115.   and the pilot is struck headlong and rolls onto his head; but a wave twists her (the ship) thrice in the same place driving [it] around and a swift whirlpool devours [it] from the sea.

118.   Scattered swimmers (swimming) appear in a vast abyss, weapons of men, and planks and the treasures of Troy through the waves.

120.   The winter storm conquers now the strong ship of Ilioneus, now of brave Achates and [the one] by which Abas was carried, and by which old Aletes [was carried]; All take on unfriendly water with the seams of sides opened and fissures open.

124.  Meanwhile Neptune senses that the sea is stirred up with a great roar and a winter storm has been sent out and still waters are poured out from the deepest depths, and looking out over the deep he lifted his peaceful head out of the top of a wave.

128.   He sees the fleet of Aeneas scattered over the whole ocean, the Trojans opressed by waves and the downfall of the heavens.

130.  Nor did the tricks and the angers of Juno evade [her] brother.

131.   He calls Eurus and Zephyr to him, then he speaks such things: Does the so great faith of you family hold you? Now winds, you dare to stir up sky and land without my consent (nod) and to raise up such burdens?

135.  I…you! But it is better to compose the stirred waves. After(wards) you atone to me for crimes with no similar punishment.

137.  Speed [your] flight and say this to your king: The rule over the sea and the savage trident was given not to that [guy] but by destiny to me. He holds the immense rocks Eurus, your homes; Let Aeolus vaunt himself in that palace and rule in that closed prison of the winds.

142.   He speaks thus and more quickly than it having been said, he calmed the swollen sea. He puts to flight the collected clouds and brings back the sun.

144.  At the same time Cymothoe and Triton dislodge the ships leaning against a sharp rock. Himself (Neptune) raises [them] with the trident and he opens the vast sand bars  and tempers the ocean and he also glides over the highest waves with light wheels.

148.  And just as when sedition had arisen in a great people and the ignoble crowd rages in their minds (hearts), And now rocks and torches fly, rage supplies weapons.

151.  Then they behold if by chance some man grave with piety and in merit, they are silent and stand with raised ears. He rules minds with words and calms chests.

154.   Thus the whole crash of the sea subsides, afterwards the father looking out over the seas and having been carried in the open sky, he turns the horses and flying he gives reins to the favorable chariot.

157.  The exhausted followers of Aeneas hurried to head for the nearest beaches with speed, and they are turned toward the shores of Libya

159.  There is a place in deep inlet: an island forms a port with a barrier of sides, by which every [wave] from the deep is broken and in the curved back bays the wave cuts itself.

162.   On this side and on this (that) side vast rocks and twin reefs tower (threaten) into the sky, beneath the top of which, the safe seas are silent; then above, the scene with quivering forests and a grove overhangs with shuddering black[ness].

166.   Beneath the face opposite the hanging reefs [there is] a cave, sweet waters within, and seats in the natural rock, homes of nymphs. Here not any chains held the exhausted ships, no anchor holds with curved bite. 

170.  Here Aeneas goes under with seven ships collected from the whole number; and with a great love the Trojans win the desired sands and they place limbs soaked with salt on the shore.

174.  And Achates strikes out a first spark from flint (Dative of separation) and he receives fire from leaves and he gives dry fuel(s) around [the fire] and he snatches up a flame in the tinder.

177.  Then tired of things they bring out spoiled Ceres (grain) and the tools of Ceres (bread making)  and recovered fruits and they prepare to roast [grain] and to break (crush) [grain] with a rock.

180.  Meanwhile Aeneas climbs the reef and seeks a view if he might see (what of) Antheus thrown by the wind and the Phrygian galleys or Capys or the arms of Caicus in the towering sterns.

184.  He sees no ship in view, three deer wandering on the shore. Whole herds follow these from the back, and a long line grazes through the valley.

187.  He stopped here and took up with his hand the bow and swift arrows, the weapons which faithful Achates  was carrying, and the he laid out first the leaders themselves with branching horns bearing their heads high, then he confuses the herd and driving the whole crowd among the leafy forests.

192.   And nor does he stop before as victor he pours out seven mighty bodies and makes the number equal with the ships.


194.   From here he heads for the port and divides [the deer] among the friends. Then the hero divided the good wine which Acestes had loaded in jars on the Sicilian shores and had given to the departing [Trojans] and soothed grieving chests with speech.

198.   O comrades (and indeed we are not ignorant of evils before), O sufferers of heavier things, god will also give an end to these (you).

200.   you approached the madness of Scylla and the roaring crags, you experienced the Cyclopean rocks; recall your [courageous] spirits and send [away] gloomy fear; and perhaps at some time it will help to remember these things.

204.   Through different disasters, through so many crises of things, we are extending into Latium, where the fates show peaceful seats; it is right for a kingdom of Troy to rise again in that place.

207.  endure, and save yourselves for better things.

208.   Saying such things with a voice, weary with huge cares, he pretends hope with his face, he pushes [down] his deep grief.

210.  They (the Trojans) gird themselves for the prize and for future feasts: they tear the hides from the sides and denude the flesh; they cut the part into pieces, and and pierce the quivering [flesh] with spits,

213.   others place bronz [urns] on the shore and tend the flames. Then they restored strengths with food, and having spread out through the grass thy filled [themselves] of old Bachus (wine) and and of rich venison.

216.  After hunger was removed by feasts and the tables were removed, they sought again lost friends with long conversation, and [they were] uncertain between hope and fear, whether to believe that those called  live, or have suffered the final end and can not now hear, having been called.

220.  Pious Aeneas groans especially now the downfall of sharp Orontes, now Amycus, and (he groans) with himself the cruel fate of Lycus and (he groans) brave Gyan and brave Cloanthus.

223.  And now there was an end, when Jupiter looking down from highest heaven at the billowing sea and lands spread out and shores and wide (spread out) peoples, thus he stopped at the top of heaven and fixed [his] lights on the kingdom[s] of Libya. 

227.  And sadder Venus, her shining eyes filled with tears, addressed him [while he was] pondering such things in his heart,

229.    “O [you] who rule the affairs of men and of gods with eternal rule, and frighten with lightening, what so great [crime] was Aeneas able to commit against you, what [crime] were the Trojans able [to commit], to whom all the orb of lands is closed off on account of Italy, having suffered so many disasters”

234.   Surely you have promised that from here one day, with the years rolling, the Romans will be leaders restored from the blood of Teucrus, who would hold the sea, who would hold all the lands with power. What idea has turned you, progenitor?

237.  Indeed, with this I found consolation for the fall of Troy and the sad downfall[s] balancing opposite fates with [these] fates; now the same fortune follows the men driven by so many misfortunes.

241.   What end of labors do you give, great king? Antenor having escaped the midst of the Greeks was able to enter the Illyrian bays, and safe, to overcome the kingdom[s] of the Liburnians, and the spring of Timavus, whence with a vast roar it comes through the nine mouths into the furious sea and overwhelms the fields with with roaring sea.

247.   Here however he located the city and homes of Patavium and he gave to the nation the name of the Teucrians and he hung the Trojan arms, now he rests settled in quiet peace:

250.   but we, your offspring, to whom you promised the palace of heaven, with ships having been lost on account of the anger of one (unspeakable!) we are betrayed and we are separated far from the Italian shores. Is this the reward of piety? Thus you restore us in power?

254.  Smiling to (at) her with a face which calms heaven and storms, the begetter of men and gods poured out kisses to the daughter, then he said such things:

257.  Spare (your) fear, Cytherea, the fate of your [people] remains unmoved for you; you will perceive the city and the promised walls of Lavinia and you will bring great souled Aeneas uplifted to the stars of heaven. And no opinion turns me.

261.  For you, (for I confess, since this care gnaws at you I will move (unveil) the rolling secrets of the fates longer) he will wage a huge war in Italy and he will crush the fierce peoples and he will place the customs for men and the walls, ruling in Latium while a third summer will have seen him ruling and three winters will have passed with the Rutulians having been subdued.

267.   But the boy, Ascanius, to whom now the name Iulus is added (he was Ilus while the Ilium state stood in power), he will fulfill in power thirty great orbs (years) with months rolling, and he will transfer the kingdom from the seat of Lavinia and he will fortify Alba Longa with great force.

272.  Here now (then), it will be ruled for three hundred total years under the Hectorean race until a queen priestess pregnant (heavy?) by Mars will give twin offspring in birth.

275.  Then Romulus happy in the brown hide of the nurse (she) wolf will inherit the nation and found the Martian (really) walls and will say (call them) Romans from his name.

278.   For them I place (establish) the boundaries of things (only), and not the times: I have given an empire without end.

279.  Nay, even fierce Juno, who now wearies the sea and lands and heaven with fear, will bring back (change) her council into [something] better and she will cherish with me the Romans, masters of the world, the toga-clad nation.

283.  Thus it is pleasing. With the years gliding, a time will come when the house of Assaracus will press the Pthians and the bright Myceneans in slavery and Argos will be ruled over. 

286.   From [this] beautiful origin will be born Trojan Caesar, who will (can) bound the empire with Oceanus, his fame to the stars, Julius, a name derived from the great name Iulus.

289.   You, one day, untroubled, will receive this [man] laden with the spoils of the Orient; this [man] will also be called in vows.  Then the ages will become mild, with wars having been put [away];

292.    white Faith and Vesta, Quirinus with brother Remus will give laws; The dreadful gates of War will be closed with iron and close seams; unholy rage sitting within over savage weapons and bound behind back with 100 bronze knots he roars horrid [things] with his bloody mouth.

297.   He said these things and he sends the son from Maia down from on high, so that the lands and so that the new towers of Carthage might lie open in welcome to the Trojans, lest Dido, unaware of fate, should keep [them] off from [her] territories.

300.   He flew out through the great air with the rowing of wings and quickly stood at the shores of Libya. And now he made orders, and the Phoenicians put [down] their fierce hearts with the god willing it; in particular the queen accepted in the Teucrians with quiet spirit and calm mind.

305.   But pious Aeneas wondering much through the night as first light is given decided to leave and explore new places, which shores he came to by wind, who held them (for he saw untilled) whether men or beasts, and to report back to his friends.


310.   He hid the fleet in a hollow beneath a hollowed out rock enclosed by trees and trembling shadows around.

312.   He went accompanied by Achates waving two spears with broad iron.

314.  to whom (to him) the mother (Venus) brought herself in the middle of the forrest to meet, wearing the face of a maiden and arms of a maiden of Sparta or such as Thracian Harpalyce [as she] wearies horses and outstrips the swift Hebrus with flight.

318.   And for the huntress hangs a ready bow from her shoulders by custom and she had given her hair to scatter I the winds, bare as to her knee and having collected her flowing folds (robe) with a knot.

321.   And before (first) she says, “Hey young men, show if you have perhaps seen any of my sisters wandering here girded with quiver and the hide of a spotted lynx, or pursuing the path of the froth of a boar with a shout.

325.   Thus Venus [spoke]; and the son of Venus in return having begun, “Nothing of your sisters has been heard or seen for (by) me, O how should I call you, virgin? For to you [there is] (you have) hardly the face of mortal, nor does (your) voice sound human; O, (you are) surely a goddess. (Or sister of Phoebus? Or one of the blood of a nymph?),

330.   whoever you may be, would you be lucky and lighten our burden and show where under the sky, on what shores of the world we have been tossed; ignorant off the men and places, we wander driven here by wind and vast waves: by our (my) right hand much victim will fall before your altars.  (KW: many a victim will fall)


335.   Then Venus: Indeed I [am] not worthy of such an honor; it is the custom for Tyrian maidens to carry a bow and to bind legs high with purple boots.

338.   You see the Punic kingdom[s] and Tyrians and the city of Agenor; but the territories of Libya [are] in intractable war.

340.   Dido ruled the kingdom having set out from the city of Tyre fleeing her brother. Long is [her] injury, long are [her] wanderings. But I follow to the highest summit of things. (I have followed the tale and can explain things from top to bottom)

343.  Sychaeus was husband to her, most rich (with respect to) of land of the Phoenicians, and for the wretched [woman], cherished with great love, to whom (to him) the father had given intact (virgin, presumably) and with omens he first joined [them]. 346.But the queen of Tyre had a brother Pygmalion, greater before all others in wickedness.  

348.   Rage came into the midst of them.  Impious, he overcame incautious Sychaeus with iron before the altars, uncaring of the love of [his] sister.

351.   and he hid the deed for a long time and (polysyndoton) concealing evil he deceived the weary loving [sister] with vain hope.

353.   But the pale ghost itself of the unburied husband came into dreams raising wails in amazing ways;

355.   he bared bloody altars and his breast pierced with iron and he uncovered the whole hidden crime of the house.

357.   Then he urges [her] to hasten escape and to leave [her] fatherland and help aid for the road he discloses in the ground ancient treasure an unknown weight of silver and of gold.

360.   Moved by these [words] Dido prepared flight and friends. 

361.   They assembled for whom there was either cruel hatred or sharp fear of the tyrant; they seized ships by chance were prepared and they loaded with gold.  The riches of greedy Pygmalion were carried on the sea; a woman [was] the leader of the deed..

365.   They came to a place where now you will see the huge walls and the surging citadel of new Carthage, and they purchased as much soil as they were able to encircle with a bull hide, Byrsa, from the name of the deed.

369.   But who then [are] you(all)? From where or from what shores do you come? Or where do you hold journey?”

371.   He [to her] asking such things sighing and dragging voice from deep in his chest: O goddess, if I were to proceed repeating first from the beginning, and there was time to hear the stories of our labors, with Olympus closed Vesper would settle the day before (I could finish).

375.   A storm by its chance drove us from ancient Troy, if perhaps the name of Troy has come through your ears, carried through various seas.

378.   I am pious Aeneas, who conveys with me in a fleet the penates snatched from the enemy, known by fame over the skies

380.   I seek Italy a fatherland and my race is from highest Jove. Twice ten have I ascended the Trojan sea in ships, with the mother goddess showing the way I followed the given fate(s).

383.   Scarcely seven [ships] survive shattered by waves from Eurus.  I myself unknown, lacking, wander the deserts of Libya, having been driven from Europe and Asia.”  And not asking more, Venus having suffered, interrupted [him] not complaining more in the middle thus with grief:

387.   Whoever you are, I believe, you hardly pluck air (breathe, draw breath) hated by the heavens (gods), who (you) have come to the Tyrian city. Just proceed and bring you(rself) to the threshold of the queen.

390.   For I announce to you that your restored friends and fleet (have been) restored and driven into safety by the changed north winds, unless my parents taught me augury falsely.

393.   Look upon those twice six swans rejoicing in a line, whom, a bird of Jove having fallen from the clear sky WAS DISTURBING in the region of the upper air; now they seem in a long line either to seize land(s) or to look down on already seized lands: as those restored mock with creaking wings and in a flock they encircle the sky and give songs, not otherwise your ships and young men either hold the port or are coming to the harbor with full sail.

401.   Just proceed, and where the road leads you, direct your step.

402.  She spoke, and turning, she gleamed out from her pink neck, and her ambrosial hair exhaled a divine scent from the top. The clothes flew down to the bottom of her feet (that is to say, lengthened, not denuded) and with her stride she revealed a true goddess. 

406.  He when he recognized his mother fleeing followed with such a voice: “What (why) do you, cruel, trick (your) son also so many times with false images? Why is it not given to join right [hand] to right [hand] and to heartrue  voices and reply?”

410.   He reproached with such things and extended his steps toward the walls. But Venus enclosed the walking [ones] with a dark mist, and the goddess poured out (for them) with a great shroud of cloud around (them), lest anyone should be able to see them or to touch them or to make a delay or to demand (their) reasons of coming

415.   She herself goes away uplifted (to) Paphos and happy revisits her throne, where [there is] a temple to her, and one hundred altars smoke with Sabaean (Arabic) incense and [the air] breathes out with [the scent of] fresh garlands.

418.   Meanwhile they snatched up the road, where the path showed. And now they were ascending a hill which much overshadowed the city and faces the citadels from above.

421.    Aeneas admired the structure, once huts, he admired the gates and the noise and the pavement of roads. The ardent Tyrians press on: part [of them] make walls (historical infinitive), and make the citadel, and roll rocks up with hands, some choose  place for a house and enclose it with a trench; they choose laws and officials, and a sacred senate.

427.   Here some are digging out a port; here others are placing the foundation for a theater, and cutting out huge columns from the rock, lofty decorations for a future stage.

430.   Just like work busies bees in the new (early) summer through flowery country under the sun, when they lead the adult swarm of the hive, or when they stuff flowing honey and fill cells with sweet nectar, or they receive the burdens of [those] arriving (with pollen), or with a battle line made, the keep the drones, a lazy swarm, from the hive; the work seethes and the fragrant honey smells of thyme.

437.   “O fortunate, whose walls now are rising!” Aeneas said, and looked up at the heights of the city.

439.   He brought himself enclosed by the cloud (amazing to see) through the middle and he mixes with men and to any he is unseen.

441.   In the middle of the city was a grove, most happy of shade, where first tossed by waves and storm the Phoenicians dug up in that place a token, which royal Juno had shown, the spirited head of a horse; for thus (they) would be through the ages distinguished in war and easy to live (hurray for supines!).

446.   Here Phoenician Dido founded a huge temple to Juno rich with gifts and the power of the goddess, for which bronze doors were rising from the steps and beams were woven with bronze and the hinge on the bronze gates was creaking.

450.   Here first in the grove a new presented thing eased fear, here first Aeneas dared to hope for safety and to better trust struck down things.

453.   For at the foot of the great temple surveying things one at a time while awaiting the queen, while he was marveling at what fortunes the city had, the hands of craftsmen, the work and labor among them, from a line the Trojan battles and wars in fame now spread through the whole world, the Atreides (sons of Atreus) and Prium and Achilles savage to both.

459.   He stopped and crying, said “What place now, Achates, what region in the wold is not full of our labors? Behold Priam. Even here there are its own rewards for glory; there are the tears of things and mortal things touch the mind.

463.   Loose fears; this story will bring some safety to you.

464.    He spoke thus and grazed his spirit with the empty picture groaning much and he wetted his face with a copious river. And for he was watching as Troy [was] battling around in this [one] the Greeks were fleeing, the Trojans were crushing the young men, in this [one] crested Achilles in his chariot stands against the Phrygians (Trojans).

469.   And not far from here crying he recognizes the tent of Rhesus with white cloth, which was betrayed on the first night; cruel Diomedes devastated with great slaughter, and then turned the burning horses into the camp before they had tasted fodder and drunk the Xanthus.

474.   In another part Troilus fleeing, with weapons having been lost, the unlucky boy unequal meets Achilles, he is carried by horses and clings on his back to the empty chariot nevertheless holding the reins; his neck and hair are dragged through the earth and the dust is marked by the turned spear.

479.   Meanwhile the Trojan women are going to the temple of not impartial Athena with hair disheveled and they bring gowns humbly, and sad, their chests are beaten with palms. The goddess having turned away holds her eyes fixed on the ground.

483.   Thrice he dragged Hector around the Trojan walls and Achilles was selling the lifeless body for gold.

485.   Then indeed he gives a great groan from the bottom of his chest as he catches sight of the spoils, as of the chariot, even as of the body itself of his friend and Priam stretching out unarmed hands.

488.   He also recognizes himself mingling with the leaders of the Greeks, and the eastern lines and the armor of dark Memnon.  Penthesilea leads the battle line of the Amazons with crescent shields raging she burns in the middle of thousands, the warrior (female) fastening a golden girdle for one exposed breast, and a girl dares to run together with men.

494.   While these things seemed wonderful to Dardanian Aeneas, and while he was dazed he hangs fixed on one view, the queen, Dido, most beautiful in form, went to the temple with a great crowd of youth thronging.

498.   Such as on the banks of the Eurotas or through the ridge of Cynthus Diana trains the dances some thousands having followed here and the Oreads are gathering here. She carries a quiver on her shoulder and proceeding she towers over all the goddesses. Joys possess the secret heart of Latona.

503.   Such was Dido, happy, she carried herself so through the middle pressing on for the work for the future kingdom.

505.   Then in gates of the goddess in the middle of the vault (tortoise) of the temple enclosed with arms on the throne she sat down resting on high.

507.   She was giving justice and laws to the men and assigning the labor of works in equal parts or by lot: when suddenly Aeneas sees Antheus and Sergentus approaching in a great group and strong Cloanthus and other Teucrans whom the black storm had scattered and had born away deep within other shores.

513.   At the same time he himself as gaping at the same time Achates was astounded by joy and fear; eagerly they burned to join right hands; but b unknown thing disturbed their minds.

516.   They disguised and looked out wrapped in the hollow cloud what fortune [there was] for the men, on what shore they had left the fleet, what (reason) they have come; chosen from all the ships they were coming begging for mercy and heading for the temple with a shout.  

7 comments:

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